Ultimate Wrap dress from Sew Over It

The end of year is fast approaching and life get even busier. For me it is important to find comfort in my wardrobe and use it to it’s best advantage. Wearing stylish and non restrictive clothes made out of fabrics that don’t need to be ironed constantly, easy to wash and a bright print to cheer me up though shorter days. I certainly picked perfectly for this month Minerva Crafts Blogging Network make. I do feel it has a ‘style’ that would suit someone you all know. Don’t you think this has Dibs name all over it? She is hosting a wrap dress sew along. This make hit another blogsphere challenge #sewgreendecember. 
This busy and bright print certainly cheers me up. The pattern used is a wrap dress design by Lisa Comfort from Sew Over it. It was originally for her sewing class and is so successful that she has made them available to sew at home. Very professional and easy pattern, part of a lovely collection. 
The pattern has facings which were ignored in favour of my beloved stretch bias. Besides having to lengthen the pattern considerably, no part of the constructions were difficult. I didn’t follow the instructions. Cuffs were added just because I’m obsessed with them right now. The sleeves are a bit oversized. 
Fabric is very soft, a bit slippery and even a bit cold to the touch. I love how it has a lovely drape. My kit comes with stretch thread meaning you can sew straight stitches.There are so many arguments between both camps, for those that believe its ok and for those who say it a mistake. Please always do a test patch first if you decide to use  straight stitches on stretchy fabric. Those seams that suffers the most stress like the shoulders were stabilised with clear elastic. All my seams were overlooked. 
I wish all the tales of this make were happy. 
First let’s talk about the unfortunately placement of the print over my bust. Because the fabric was so busy I didn’t realise the repeats and as I cut on the wrong side, I didn’t spotted it till I had everything cut. Opps. To be completely honest, it doesn’t really bother at all.
Then the overlocker aka green-eyed monster, eat my dress during the 1st seam. After loads of **** ‘not suitable’ words were pronounced out loud, I shared the disaster picture on my instagram and moved away from the machine for a good a cup of tea. 
Recently some Australians Tim Tams came my way and after a Tim Tam Slam I managed calm down. When we make mistakes we have to step away and think about possible solutions and I had 2:
  1. Scrap the dress and ask Minerva Craft for more fabric, recut and start again
  2. Try to rescue the dress
I decided to try to fix it first as I could always ask for help. After a few minutes mentally browsing some ideas, I remember the ‘pot hole’ technique I learned at FQ retreat back in July. A quilting type of appliqué that the fabric is placed underneath and appliqué stitch on top. It worked quite well thanks to the busy fabric and position of the hole, with was in the bottom corner partially covered by the overwrap front piece.

Follow the position of my finger, I’m pointing to the patched area.
Now, let me get wrapped up because is freezing outside.

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  • Gorgeous Rachel! Is that available as a PDF pattern?

  • It’s a great dress! Too bad you had some trouble during construction, but I don’t think anyone will notice!

    • thanks Wendy, I have worn the dress a few times and no one notices, even when I point it out.

  • Oi Rachel 🙂 Amei seu vestido! Lindo demais!! Aliás tudo que vc faz, adorei seu blog! Te descobri através do site da Minerva quando estava olhando alguns tecidos pra comprar, fiquei tão contente em saber que há uma brasileira 🙂 tb costuro mas não tão bem quanto vc, ainda aprendendo. Já estou te seguindo 🙂

    Beijos!! Liza.

    • Oi Lisa, obrigada pelo carinho…. Se tiver um blog me fala pra eu te acompanhar … Beijos xx

  • Anonymous

    Oi Rachel 🙂 Amei seu vestido! Lindo! Aliás tudo q vc faz, te achei quando estava olhando o site da minerva procurando alguns tecidos para comprar e fiquei tão contente em saber que há uma brasileira no “blog network” então resolvi te visitar e nossa vc e tão talentosa e me inspira a avançar na minha humilde costura rsrs já estou te seguindo 🙂

    Beijos!!
    Liza.

  • Fabulous! And clever fix!

    • Thank you darling. Nice to be able to show the good and bad of a project, isn’t it?

  • What a beautiful dress. I absolutely love the fabric. Why is it when I truly fall in love with a fabric, it is in another country? You did a great job with this and none of us would have known you had a problem with the serger if you had not told us. Your coat works beautifully with it too! Great ensemble.

  • You mentioned that your kit came with stretch thread. Is this lovely outfit available as a kit? It might truly be worth the postage to get it to the US.

  • Beautiful dress!!

  • Great dress, Rachel! You did an awesome job and I love the pothole technique. CLEVER!

    • is so interesting how knowledge from different “sewing” areas can be transferable.

  • Love it, looks gorgeous. I laughed when I saw your instagram pic of the placement haha..
    mmm Tim tams are the best 🙂

    • i just got my second batch of tim tams.. this time dark chocolate

  • Beautiful make! I love wrap dresses so much, they are always SO flattering! And this is no exception! Well done! And brilliant save with your patch job!

    • Thank you, indeed wrap dresses are universally flattering. Im a huge fan !

  • Tim Tams help sewers all the time 🙂
    This is a beautiful dress. I can’t see the patch job at all.

    • thank you. I have found taking a break from a situation always the best alternative before evaluating the mistake and finding a solution.

  • Great dress and a wonderful save!! I’m going to start sewing with knits next year, hopefully I can make some beautiful dresses like you.

  • I LOVE this pattern, it looks great on your Rachel!

  • Look at you – making me want to make a wrap dress now! Seriously, I’ve never been a wrap dress girl but I think you’re making me reconsider. Also, awesome fabric print!!

  • I think you should consider wearing wrap dresses all the time. Seriously.

  • Pingback: Into the woods – House of Pinheiro()

  • Pingback: Readers Request: Stretch bias finish – House of Pinheiro()

Ultimate Wrap dress from Sew Over It

The end of year is fast approaching and life get even busier. For me it is important to find comfort in my wardrobe and use it to it’s best advantage. Wearing stylish and non restrictive clothes made out of fabrics that don’t need to be ironed constantly, easy to wash and a bright print to cheer me up though shorter days. I certainly picked perfectly for this month Minerva Crafts Blogging Network make. I do feel it has a ‘style’ that would suit someone you all know. Don’t you think this has Dibs name all over it? She is hosting a wrap dress sew along. This make hit another blogsphere challenge #sewgreendecember. 
This busy and bright print certainly cheers me up. The pattern used is a wrap dress design by Lisa Comfort from Sew Over it. It was originally for her sewing class and is so successful that she has made them available to sew at home. Very professional and easy pattern, part of a lovely collection. 
The pattern has facings which were ignored in favour of my beloved stretch bias. Besides having to lengthen the pattern considerably, no part of the constructions were difficult. I didn’t follow the instructions. Cuffs were added just because I’m obsessed with them right now. The sleeves are a bit oversized. 
Fabric is very soft, a bit slippery and even a bit cold to the touch. I love how it has a lovely drape. My kit comes with stretch thread meaning you can sew straight stitches.There are so many arguments between both camps, for those that believe its ok and for those who say it a mistake. Please always do a test patch first if you decide to use  straight stitches on stretchy fabric. Those seams that suffers the most stress like the shoulders were stabilised with clear elastic. All my seams were overlooked. 
I wish all the tales of this make were happy. 
First let’s talk about the unfortunately placement of the print over my bust. Because the fabric was so busy I didn’t realise the repeats and as I cut on the wrong side, I didn’t spotted it till I had everything cut. Opps. To be completely honest, it doesn’t really bother at all.
Then the overlocker aka green-eyed monster, eat my dress during the 1st seam. After loads of **** ‘not suitable’ words were pronounced out loud, I shared the disaster picture on my instagram and moved away from the machine for a good a cup of tea. 
Recently some Australians Tim Tams came my way and after a Tim Tam Slam I managed calm down. When we make mistakes we have to step away and think about possible solutions and I had 2:
  1. Scrap the dress and ask Minerva Craft for more fabric, recut and start again
  2. Try to rescue the dress
I decided to try to fix it first as I could always ask for help. After a few minutes mentally browsing some ideas, I remember the ‘pot hole’ technique I learned at FQ retreat back in July. A quilting type of appliqué that the fabric is placed underneath and appliqué stitch on top. It worked quite well thanks to the busy fabric and position of the hole, with was in the bottom corner partially covered by the overwrap front piece.

Follow the position of my finger, I’m pointing to the patched area.
Now, let me get wrapped up because is freezing outside.

Share: